Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is additional funding provided to schools, based on the number of pupils they have who receive Free School Meals (FSM).

Under the legislation governing the awarding of the Pupil Premium to schools, the way that the Pupil Premium is spent and the impact it has on the school needs to be published on the School’s website.  The details for Ashmead are below.

Pupil Premium Strategy 2016-17 (reviewed in July 2017)

Ashmead Primary School Pupil Premium Strategy

Pupil Premium 2015-16

 Total pupil premium: £95,994

Planned expenditure:

 

  • KS2 intervention teacher (0.5)
  • KS1 intervention teacher (Summer term 2015)
  • Release time for deputy headteacher.
  • Funding release time for coaching for teachers.
  • Numicon intervention.
  • Speech and language interventions.
  • 1-1 reading interventions.
  • Catch-Up literacy intervention.
  • Catch-Up numeracy intervention.

 

  • Paying for children without internet access at home to have a school laptop with mobile data paid for by the school.
  • Use of inclusion leader and skilled teaching assistant time to offer some 1:1 and group support to more vulnerable children.
  • Subsidising cost of after school clubs, music tuition and residential school journey.
  • Purchase of mp3 players for children to be able to listen to audiobooks at home.
  • Beanstalk reading volunteers.
  • Purchase of books for pupil premium children.
  • Purchase of Babcock spelling programme.
  • Investment in Sound Training spelling and grammar intervention.
  • Purchase of TEEP teacher development programme (about £6,000) (TBC)
  • Creation of extra full-time intervention support staff position/s (TBC)

 

(NB Due to unexpected staffing changes at the beginning of the academic year we have had to put our KS1 intervention teacher into Year One as a job-share with the deputy head. This has significantly reduced our capacity for interventions tailored to close pupil premium gaps, especially in KS1. )

Impact of spending 2015-16

Progress overall was close to progress of non PP children and good overall. In Y6 it was significantly stronger. However, PP children’s attainment remains generally behind non PP children, most significantly in writing.

Progress averaged across the whole school:

Reading Writing Maths
PUPIL PREM 3.1 2.9 3.6
NON P PREM 3.0 3.0 3.3

 

Progress across the year was very strong in Year Six. In other year groups progress was good apart from Year Five and Writing in Year Three.

In our EYFS three out of our four disadvantaged children reached a Good Level of Development.

In KS1 we had strong phonics results with all five of our disadvantaged children meeting the standard. In Year Two PP progress was strong. Of our seven PP children, three attained at age expectations, three attained at just below age expectations and one was below age expectations in two out of three subjects.

In Year Six we had very strong progress in the year, exceeding that of non PP children. Of our six PP children three achieved ARE in Reading (with one exceeding), four in Maths, three in GPS and one in Writing. Our four middle children had insufficient progress from Year Two to Year Six.

 

Pupil Premium 2014-15

 

Total pupil premium: £96,200

 

This year we are continuing to review carefully the impact of our pupil premium expenditure. For example, we make sure that we are aware of the information provided by the Sutton Trust and the Education Endowment Fund regarding the most effective use of pupil premium funding. We want to ensure we build on good practice but we also want to innovate along the lines of evidence-based approaches.

 

One of the most effective uses of pupil premium is to raise the quality of class teaching. Of course, doing this is always a key school priority but we will be using some pupil premium to contribute to actions such as:

 

  • Funding release for teachers to observe each other (‘lesson study’ approach)
  • Coaching for teachers as self-driven improvement is one of the keys to effective professional development
  • Purchasing books to aid professional development

 

Other key uses of pupil premium this year:

 

  • Contributing to the cost of release time for the deputy headteacher
  • Contributing to the cost of KS1 and KS2 intervention teachers
  • Contributing to the cost of extra teaching assistant support, particularly that which focuses on numicon interventions and numeracy and literacy catch-up interventions.
  • Paying for children without internet access at home to have a school laptop with mobile data paid for by the school.
  • Use of inclusion leader and skilled teaching assistant time to offer some 1:1 and group support to more vulnerable children.
  • Subsidising cost of after school clubs, music tuition and residential school journey.
  • Purchase of mp3 players for children to be able to listen to audiobooks at home.
  • Beanstalk reading volunteers.

 

Analysis of impact 2014-15

 

KS1

 

Year One phonics check. Four of our seven disadvantaged children passed the phonics screening check. Of the children who didn’t pass internal analysis shows very strong progress from a low baseline in the Autumn term.

 

Year Two. 88% of our 16 disadvantaged children have passed the phonics screening check. This is above the national average of 84% but below the 95% pass rate of our non-disadvantaged children.

 

Our Year Two disadvantaged children’s average attainment in all subjects is above the national average but below the average for our non-disadvantaged children. However, this class had a much more significant gap at the end of Reception so we are pleased to see that the gap has narrowed in the last two years.

 

Progress across the year was very strong for our disadvantaged children at 5.4 NC points, very slightly below the 5.7 points achieved by our non disadvantaged children.

 

(NB Our KS2 data is effected by one of our children not attending school for over two years. As an inclusive school we carry this child’s data of course but in terms of measuring real impact the published figures are affected by this. )

 

Our value-added score for disadvantaged pupils is above national average(101.7 overall, 101.6 in Reading, 102.1 in Writing and 101.5 in Maths). It is below the value-added score of our other pupils however.

 

In terms of attainment at KS2 we do have an increased gap between our disadvantaged pupils and other pupils.

 

Published figures are at 79% for reading/writing/maths at L4+ but if we adjust for our child who wasn’t here we get 85% which is the national average.

 

Published figures are at 86% for maths and reading but if we adjust for our child who wasn’t here we get 92% which is above the national average.

 

Published figures are at 79% for writing but if we adjust for our child who wasn’t here we get 85%. However, this is still below the national average of 90%.

 

Published figures are at 57% for SPAG but if we adjust for our child who wasn’t here we get 62%. However, this is still substantially below the national average of 84%.

 

 

All of these attainment figures still leave a substantial gap with our non disadvantaged children. To put this into context, the two children who did not get to Level Four in all subjects both have substantial SEND issues (one has an EHCP), three of the children who did get to L4 in all subjects had substantial behaviour issues in early KS2 that needed significant intervention and one child had significant emotional issues at home.

 

Our internal analysis of SPAG results, where we have a very significant gap, show that most children fell below the expected level due to spelling rather than due to not doing well enough on the punctuation and grammar paper. We are addressing spelling across KS2 in a number of ways this year.

 

At Level 5 or above we are at the national average of 29% for children attaining this level in reading, writing and maths. Although there are substantial in-school gaps between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children it should be noted that none of our disadvantaged children attained at Level Three in any subject in Year Two so all of the L5s achieved this year are through exceeding expected progress.

 

Progress in Year Six across the year was strong at 5.0 points, outstripping the progress of non-disadvantaged children.

 

Average progress of all pupil premium children last year was strong at 4.7%, slightly below the average for non-pupil premium children of 5.0%.

 

 

Pupil Premium 2013-14

 

Total pupil premium: £60,039

 

This year’s pupil premium contributed to the following:

 

  • 5 KS1 intervention teacher
  • 5 KS2 intervention teacher
  • 4 KS2 intervention teacher
  • Learning Mentor
  • Teaching assistant support
  • 1 day a week of release time for the deputy headteacher

 

This contributed towards a closing of the attainment gap between pupil premium and non pupil premium children. Average progress across the school last year for pupil premium children was 4.1 compared to 4.2 for non pupil premium children. Six out of our seven pupil premium children in this year’s Year Six cohort achieved a Level Four or above in Reading, Writing and Maths. The seventh child achieved this level in writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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